Sashiko sampler Pattern 9

Sashiko sampler Pattern 9

Pattern 9: Seven Treasures (Shippo tsunagi) You might recognise this pattern as wine glass or double wedding ring. In Japan this motif was often used to decorate Buddhist art. It is said to represent the seven precious jewels mentioned in Buddhist writings. This is the last pattern in the Sashiko sewalong. Draw out a ¾” grid on to one of your 3” squares of your sampler. You will also need a circular stencil to drawn around. This needs to measure just slightly less than 1 ½”. Use your circular stencil or shape to draw in the first four circles. Now draw in the  centre circle and using the template complete the rest of the overlapping pattern. The short Sashiko needle works well for this design to help you get round the curves more easily. Thread your needle with double thread and a knot on the end. I have worked seven stitches in each curved section. There is no set order to stitching this design however you should stitch the wavy lines and not complete circles in order to minimise the amount of knots. You can turn the corner at the end of the wavy line. Leave small loops as before to stop the work becoming drawn up. Work your way back and forth until all the lines in one direction have been completed. Turn the work around and complete the lines in the opposite direction and the pattern will slowly emerge. Post pictures of your finished pattern to my facebook page Brightonfashionandtextileschool and share on Instagram with #sashikosampler or email it to me if you prefer by the Monday...
Sashiko Sampler pattern 8

Sashiko Sampler pattern 8

Pattern 8: Fundo (Scale weights) I am going to post both of the last two patterns for this Sashiko sewalong this week to make up for my tardiness as my northern friends put it. This first design has a satisfying symmetry about it that we might recognise as an apple core design.  I thought it would be good to have another curvy design to complement the Wild Grasses design. Draw out a ½” grid on to one of your 3” squares of your sampler. You will also need a circular stencil to drawn around. This needs to measure just slightly less than 1”. Use your circular stencil or shape to draw in the diagonal lines in one direction alternating the concave and convex lines as shown Next draw in the diagonal lines in the other direction completing the shapes at the corners. I suggest you use a short sashiko needle for this design to help you get round the curves more easily. Thread your needle with double thread and a knot on the end. I have worked four stitches in each curved section. Stitch the diagonal lines in one direction first starting and finishing each row with a knot. I have left a small loop at each junction on the wrong side. Take care to leave an even gap at each junction so that the stitches do not collide when the next diagonal line of stitches cross this area. This is what it should look like when you have completed all the diagonal rows. Complete each of the four corners separately. Post pictures of your finished pattern to my...
Sashiko Sampler Pattern 7

Sashiko Sampler Pattern 7

Pattern 7: Hishi seigaiha (Waves) So I fully expected to have time while I was away in Korea to post this sewalong pattern. How wrong I was as the Bojagi Forum kept me busy, busy from dawn till dusk. Also I notice that like me the tide of summer activities has kept some of us away from our beloved stitching and I hope now as normal routines return you will have a chance to catch up on the patterns and enjoy this new one. This is quite an intricate pattern. I have drawn it out on squared paper first so that you can see more clearly how the pattern is built up. (3” square on ¼” grid paper) This is a design that is best sewn with the long sashiko needle so that you can load all the stitches in a segment at once. I found it is helpful to draw this design out on graph paper first in order to understand how the pattern is built up.  I have used a ¼” grid and a  3” square. Begin by coying the red lines. Now add the diagonal lines in one direction. Follow the diagram above. Now add the last set of diagonal lines in the opposite direction. I traced the 1/4″ grid and the main structure of the pattern onto the fabric only. I used the paper design to help guide me to fill in the rest of the pattern. You might also find it helpful to place one ruler against the line on the paper design and use a second ruler to draw the position of the...
Sashiko Sampler Pattern 6

Sashiko Sampler Pattern 6

Pattern 6: Juji Kikko (Crossed tortoiseshell) This design is a variation of the traditional tortoiseshell pattern that I have altered with diagonal crosses instead of vertical crosses. I like the hexagon shapes which remind me of grandmother’s flower garden design in English paper piecing. I suggest you continue to use a short sashiko needle for this design to cope with the smaller stitches and short lines. Mark out a grid of ¾” vertical lines and 3/8” horizontal lines on one of your squares on your sampler. Thread your needle with double thread and a knot on the end. I have worked three stitches for each side of each hexagon. Begin in the top right hand corner and stitch the first two sides of the first half hexagon. Similar to pattern 5 there is an order of work to follow for each motif. Add the half flower or cross to the centre as shown before looping across the back to start stitching the three sides of the next hexagon. (You’ll notice that while I was planning this pattern I popped in a few extra vertical lines so that my brain could check how the pattern was going to work!) Add the first two stitches in the centre of the second hexie, arranged along the diagonal line towards the bottom right hand side. Add the last two stitches working them towards the top left hand side. This way the needle and thread are pointing in the right direction for the next line of stitching. Few! Complete the first row and then come back in the opposite direction for row two, maintaining...
Sashiko Sampler Pattern 5

Sashiko Sampler Pattern 5

Pattern 5: Nowaki (Wild grasses) I have chosen this week’s design wild grasses inspired by the grasses in my own garden being tossed around in the wind and rain today. Hopefully the sun will return soon. I suggest you use a short sashiko needle for this design to help you get round the curves. You will also need a circular stencil to drawn around that measures 1 3/8”. It might be worth measuring a few things around the house like coins or cotton reels? If not you’ll need to get that compass out! Mark out a ¾” grid on one of your squares on the sampler. Use your circular template to draw on the design. I use this size template to accommodate the width of the drawn line. You can use the same template to mark the arcs for the grass. Notice that the second grass line finishes ¼” away from the vertical line. There is a sensible order to work each motif and once you have completed the first two rows of semi-circles you’ll find it easy to complete the rest of the pattern. Thread your needle with double thread and a knot on the end. Decide how many stitches you want to place along the shortest grass line. I have used four. Leave a small loop at the back and stitch the second grass line. I used five stitches. This gets you back to the beginning again and you can stitch across the whole semi-circle before repeating the process for the next motif. Oddly I found 13 stitches fitted just nicely but that’s up to you. Now...
Sashiko Sampler Pattern 4

Sashiko Sampler Pattern 4

  Pattern 4: Kawari Kikkozashi (Tortoiseshell Stitch) I love this traditional Japanese tortoiseshell motif which only takes on its final appearance when the single thread stitches are placed at the centre of each hexagon. We will be doing some needle threading to create some of this design as well. I have used the long sashiko needle again for this design so that I can load the whole row of stitches at one go before pulling them through. Mark out a ½” grid on one of your squares on the sampler. Thread your needle with double thread and a knot at one end. Stitch rows back and forth across the square at ¼” intervals. Make each stitch ¼” long. Remember to leave loops at either end of a row on the wrong side just like before. And now for the fun bit. Start in one corner with double thread and come out at ¼” up on a line. Turn your needle around and thread under the first stitch. Next thread your needle under the first stitch in the row above. Return to the first row and thread the needle under the next stitch and so on. By turning your needle round you don’t risk splitting the thread of the sewn stitches. Don’t be tempted to thread more than one stitch at a time. You need to try and keep the threads lying flat and not twisted! Here is the first row completed. I didn’t leave a loop on the back for these rows. Just try not pull the thread too tightly. It forms a single stitch on the back as...